Archives for the month of: November, 2012

[Update: Wpromote’s team just landed an amazing wedding infographic on the Huffington Post! Check it out!]

I just wanted to take a moment to give kudos to the creative minds at Wpromote behind some recent infographics. If you’re unaware of what an infographic is, you can read more about them here. They’re essentially just visual displays of data in a fun and digestible format. They take a lot of research and talent to create and our team (especially Ryan and Michelle) does a wonderful job.

Check out some of their latest work below!

California Wine infographic from ONEHOPE Wine
Presented By ONEHOPE Wine Online Fifty Percent of Profits Go To Charity

distracted driving infographic from ifa auto insurance
Presented By IFA Auto Insurance

Small Business Concerns Study 2011-2012 , California Bank and Trust
Presented By California Bank and Trust Small Business Banking

This video is so great, so stupid, and–least surprisingly–so Microsoft.

I’ll explain that but, first, let me give you some context. A few months ago, Google announced that it’s somewhat popular but often ignored free service, Google Shopping (formerly Froogle), would become a pay-to-play environment. These new ads would be called PLAs or Product Listing Ads. This was met with a lot of pushback by some who were ranking well in Google Shopping but met also with some optimism from those who weren’t ranking well and had nowhere to go to find out what they could do about it. Therefore, although nobody likes ads, the system is still powered in an identical fashion (i.e. shopping feeds from e-commerce sites). The only thing that has changed is the way that Google determines rank, which is now done by willingness to pay in addition to relevance.

Chances are good that you had no idea about any of this, unless you worked at Wpromote or an agency like ours. Chances are better that, now that you know, you still don’t care. That’s precisely why this video is so strange. It’s actually a nifty little indictment on the abundance of ads on a Google search engine results page (SERP) but it’s a criticism of something that, ultimately, is esoteric at best and irrelevant at worst.

That’s why it’s so very Microsoft. They’re not wrong but, ultimately, I think they’ve missed the mark. Reminds me a little of this guy:

[TechCrunch]

 

Don’t knock boredom. Sometimes it leads to amazing things, such as the mash up of football analysis and rampant quoting of The Princess Bride. As the COO of a company which has named its conference rooms after characters from this classic movie, I wholeheartedly endorse this video. [Buzzfeed]

Super psyched about this. Thanks to Ryan Farrell for pushing me to fix the Posterous disaster (to which I’ll have to dedicate a post in the near future) and for helping me get this thing back online. If anyone else lost all of their content because Posterous went belly up and stopped responding, check out this handy article to help you  migrate to WordPress. Like most things in life, it was much easier than I expected and it was really laziness and fear of failure that kept me from addressing it.

Now, to tackle the broken cabinet in my kitchen… tomorrow.